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Emily R. Stern, Ph.D.

Emily R. Stern, Ph.D.

Research Scientist
Clinical Research
845-398-6636

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Dr. Emily Stern is a Research Scientist at the Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and Associate Professor at the New York University School of Medicine in the Department of Psychiatry. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in experimental psychology, and completed post-doctoral training at the University of Michigan where her research focused on neural circuit functioning in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and EEG. Before joining NKI, Dr. Stern was Associate Professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Dr. Stern’s research investigates neural mechanisms associated with cognitive, affective, and sensory processes contributing to core features in psychiatric disorders, with a particular focus on OCD and related disorders including Tourette’s disorder and depression. Her work uses task-based fMRI, functional connectivity, and diffusion imaging approaches to better understand heterogeneity in psychiatric disorders, generally, and the neurobiology of different phenotypic presentations of OCD, specifically. The overall aim of this work is to use these findings to develop more personalized and targeted treatments. Her research has been funded by foundations and NIMH and published in a variety of neuroimaging and psychiatric journals.

Learn more about Dr. Stern's Psychiatric NeuroCognition Laboratory (PNClab).

Select Publications

Bragdon LB, Nota JA, Eng GK, Recchia N, Kravets P, Collins KA, Stern ER. Failures of Urge Suppression in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Behavioral Modeling Using a Blink Suppression Task. J Obsessive Compuls Relat Disord. 2023 Jul;38:100824. doi: 10.1016/j.jocrd.2023.100824. Epub 2023 Jun 22. PMID: 37521712; PMCID: PMC10373599.

Bragdon LB, Eng GK, Recchia N, Collins KA, Stern ER. Cognitive Neuroscience of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2023 Mar;46(1):53-67. doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2022.11.001. Epub 2022 Dec 27. PMID: 36740355.

Bragdon LB, Eng GK, Belanger A, Collins KA, Stern ER. Interoception and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Review of Current Evidence and Future Directions. Front Psychiatry. 2021 Aug 25;12:686482. doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2021.686482. PMID: 34512412; PMCID: PMC8424053.

Collins KA, Eng GK, Tural Ü, Irvin MK, Iosifescu DV, Stern ER. Affective and somatic symptom clusters in depression and their relationship to treatment outcomes in the STAR*D sample. J Affect Disord. 2022 Mar 1;300:469-473. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2021.12.046. Epub 2021 Dec 21. PMID: 34952119.

Eng GK, Collins KA, Brown C, Ludlow M, Tobe RH, Iosifescu DV, Stern ER. Relationships between interoceptive sensibility and resting-state functional connectivity of the insula in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Cereb Cortex. 2022 Nov 21;32(23):5285-5300. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhac014. PMID: 35257146; PMCID: PMC9712718.

Eng GK, Collins KA, Brown C, Ludlow M, Tobe RH, Iosifescu DV, Stern ER. Dimensions of interoception in obsessive-compulsive disorder. J Obsessive Compuls Relat Disord. 2020 Oct;27:100584. doi: 10.1016/j.jocrd.2020.100584. Epub 2020 Sep 10. PMID: 33194538; PMCID: PMC7665060.

Stern ER, Eng GK, De Nadai AS, Iosifescu DV, Tobe RH, Collins KA. Imbalance between default mode and sensorimotor connectivity is associated with perseverative thinking in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Transl Psychiatry. 2022 Jan 12;12(1):19. doi: 10.1038/s41398-022-01780-w. PMID: 35022398; PMCID: PMC8755709.

Stern ER, Brown C, Ludlow M, Shahab R, Collins K, Lieval A, Tobe RH, Iosifescu DV, Burdick KE, Fleysher L. The buildup of an urge in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Behavioral and neuroimaging correlates. Hum Brain Mapp. 2020 Apr 15;41(6):1611-1625. doi: 10.1002/hbm.24898. Epub 2020 Jan 9. PMID: 31916668; PMCID: PMC7082184.